It’s Easy To Be Angry

Why is happiness so much work?

Darren Stehle

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Me and Reggie, May 2015. There is possibly no better way to experience happiness, than to love a dog.

In the moment it doesn’t feel like you’ve done anything wrong.

In the moment you feel like your anger is justified.

In the moment you aren’t thinking about anyone else but your own self-preservation.

Anger is easier than happiness, but it comes at a great cost.

Giving in to anger is allowing your ancient, reptilian brain to have complete control.

Imagine for a moment a reptile, or any animal fighting another. There is no compassion, empathy, questioning, logical reasoning, or collaboration.

Anger is a reaction which is not present moment awareness. Anger does not serve a choice based on higher consciousness or betterment.

A re-action is a chemical, emotional, or survival response to a current event — positive or negative. An action is something you chose, or plan do for the future.

Too much anger and you start to wear down your body.

Your brain releases the chemical, cortisol, during fight or flight. The more you are angry or highly stressed, the greater the flood or cortisol in your bloodstream. Too much cortisol becomes toxic and weakens your immune system, limits burning body fat as a source of energy, and limits muscle growth.

Happiness is work. Especially if it’s not a normal emotion for you.

Happiness requires being present. When you are present you can respond to a situation or what someone says without re-action.

Happiness can be the more difficult state to attain and maintain than anger. Have noticed how easy it is to slide into anger?

Why does happiness requires so much conscious work and practice?

Anything truly worth having, anything that can make us happier humans, is worth working on with conscious, regular practice.

Be an example of happiness for others.

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Darren Stehle

I ghostwrite thought leadership articles for executive coaches to showcase your best ideas, increase client engagement, and drive change @ DarrenStehle.com